How MCA means family to teacher Travis Webb

At the Webb home, it’s certainly a full house. Maranatha teacher Travis Webb and his wife Kristy have a total of 11 children, 10 of whom were adopted. Their oldest son, Nathanael, is 20, with four-year-old Isabella rounding out the group. Strong Christian family is at the center of everything we do at Maranatha, and that same heart extends to the Webb family.

Mr. Webb and his wife, Kristy, met while they were college students at Baylor University, and soon discovered a common calling to adopt. “We’d both considered adoption even before we met, and when we started dating, it was something we discussed fairly early on,” Mr. Webb says.

Their Christian faith was a driving force behind the decision to adopt, Mr. Webb continues. “Adoption is used in scripture to explain our relationship to God, and it is a symbol of the spiritual reality of what God has done for us,” he says.

In part because of the time they’d each spent in Africa, they started their family with adoptions in Ethiopia and Liberia, later adopting two foster children in the United States. Several Webb children attend Maranatha, and the MCA community had rallied around the entire Webb family.

Webb Family

“At Maranatha, the faculty has done an amazing job of coming alongside our kids and treating them just like every other kid here,” says the Cultural Geography and Ancient History teacher. “We’ve been very fortunate.”

The Webb family has appreciated Maranatha’s PETS program — that’s short for Prayer, Encouragement and Treats. MCA parents spend a year rallying around a specific teacher and that teacher’s family. “Every year I’ve been at Maranatha, families have come alongside me as a teacher and supported us, with things like gift cards and favorite coffee . . . it’s been a blessing to us.”

Informally, a group of families with a heart for the Webbs have banded together to offer support. “They pretty regularly bring us dinner, or groceries we can turn into dinner. Because of the number of kids we have to feed on a regular basis, it’s a big blessing that they’ve endeavored to do this for our family,” he says. The group has even give the Webbs holiday dinners for Easter and Thanksgiving.

“We know other families who have adopted in places not quite as open as Maranatha, and it’s been more challenging for them,” Mr. Webb says. “I’ve been fortunate that Maranatha has accepted our family.

As a Cultural Geography and Ancient History teacher, Mr. Webb often has occasion to talk about family and cultural differences in his classroom. “We talk about the definition of family in different cultures especially, and I always incorporate the idea that these are important subjects for the students to talk about with their parents,” he explains. “We study history and geography, but ultimately that’s for the purpose of knowing who God is, why we’re here and understanding the Gospel and our role as his creation.”

In and out of the classroom, Maranatha offers a compassionate, Christian family environment. “We are thankful for the opportunity to have adopted and to share our journey with the Maranatha community — and hopefully, our family is a visible representation of what God has done for us through Christ.”